We Still Love John

October 14, 2009

Summary of Scenario (The Story of John)

Filed under: #0: scenario — Elizabeth Hope @ 2:48 pm

John is a Primary Six boy who suffers from feelings of low self-esteem, convinced that he can do nothing better than fail in academic subjects. He believes that it is impossible for him to even pass some of his subjects like Chinese, because his brain has been damaged, and he has been consistently failing Chinese ever since he was in Primary Two.

At home, John faces a dysfunctional family situation, where his parents are divorced and constantly quarrel and argue over what’s best for John, wanting to take him into consideration but not realising that their arguments simply create a home environment that is not at all conducive for his social or emotional growth. His way of dealing with these situations is to unconstructively bang his head against the wall, or gaming his stress away.

His mother’s male partner deals with his poor academic behaviour by resorting to physical punishment, and his mother heaps on the emotional abuse by telling John he is an “embarrassment.” It is a far cry from his Primary One and Two days, when he topped the class and went home to proud and supportive parents. Now, his mother and her partner do not think twice about leaving him at home alone, as they go on vacations together, leaving his grandparents to take care of him.

In Math lessons, he is unmotivated and disengaged in group work because of his poor grasp of Mathematic concepts, and because he thinks that it does not matter, anyway. His Mathematics teacher is not very sympathetic to what he views as lazy and uncooperative behaviour. His form teacher, however, takes a concerned stance that John is not living up to his potential, despite the fact that he seems like a bright child.

To his Mathematics teacher, who once screamed at him for not getting his consent form signed, John reacted in aggression by throwing a chair at him, and did not bat an eyelash when he was sent to the principal for his behaviour.

John is a Primary Six boy who suffers from feelings of low self-esteem, convinced that he can do nothing better than fail in academic subjects. He believes that it is impossible for him to even pass some of his subjects like Chinese, because his brain has been damaged, and he has been consistently failing Chinese ever since he was in Primary Two.

At home, John faces a dysfunctional family situation, where his parents are divorced and constantly quarrel and argue over what’s best for John, wanting to take him into consideration but not realising that their arguments simply create a home environment that is not at all conducive for his social or emotional growth. His way of dealing with these situations is to unconstructively bang his head against the wall, or gaming his stress away

His mother’s male partner deals with his poor academic behaviour by resorting to physical punishment, and his mother heaps on the emotional abuse by telling John he is an “embarrassment.” It is a far cry from his Primary One and Two days, when he topped the class and went home to proud and supportive parents. Now, his mother and her partner do not think twice about leaving him at home alone, as they go on vacations together, leaving his grandparents to take care of him.

In Math lessons, he is unmotivated and disengaged in group work because of his poor grasp of Mathematic concepts, and because he thinks that it does not matter, anyway. His Mathematics teacher is not very sympathetic to what he views as lazy and uncooperative behaviour. His form teacher, however, takes a concerned stance that John is not living up to his potential, despite the fact that he seems like a bright child.

To his Mathematics teacher, who once screamed at him for not getting his consent form signed, John reacted in aggression by throwing a chair at him, and did not bat an eyelash when he was sent to the principal for his behaviour.

With his fellow classmates, John tries to engage with them, but because of a poor environment at home, he does not know how to relate well in social circumstances, leading to situations where the boys do not want to be on the same team as him, and he is often rejected and left out of activities. He reacts physically and aggressively to this, shoving his classmates and calling them names to protect his pride.

With his fellow classmates, John tries to engage with them, but because of a poor environment at home, he does not know how to relate well in social circumstances, leading to situations where the boys do not want to be on the same team as him, and he is often rejected and left out of activities. He reacts physically and aggressively to this, shoving his classmates and calling them names to protect his pride.

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